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STATE

The official magazine of Oklahoma State University

OSU Center for Health Sciences News Briefs

 

The Royal Society of London selected an image submitted by Paul Gignac, assistant professor of anatomy, as a finalist in its annual photography competition. Gignac's submission is a chemically enhanced microcomputerized tomography scan of a snakehead and brain. (PHOTO / PAUL GIGNAC)
Brevimalictic chikasha is the name selected for a new species of mammal discovered last year on an archeological dig by Kent Smith, OSU Center for Health Sciences associate dean in the Office for the Advancement of American Indians in Medicine and Science.

 

 

Scientific works of art exhibited

 

The Royal Society of London selected an image submitted by Paul Gignac, assistant professor of anatomy, as a finalist in its annual photography competition. Gignac’s submission is a chemically enhanced microcomputerized tomography scan of a snakehead and brain. The image was produced in collaboration with Nathan Kley at Stony Brook University in New York and is part of Gignac’s research into methods capable of visualizing soft-tissue anatomy in micro-CT images. The research is funded through a $300,000 National Science Foundation grant.

 

The photography competition celebrates the power of photography to communicate science and the role images play in making science more accessible to a wide audience.

 

 

Discovery Named

 

Brevimalictic chikasha is the name selected for a new species of mammal discovered last year on an archeological dig by Kent Smith, OSU Center for Health Sciences associate dean in the Office for the Advancement of American Indians in Medicine and Science.

 

In a presentation at the Chickasaw Nation’s Annual Arts & Cultural Awards, Smith presented a replica of the found bone, cast in bronze, to Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby.

 

Smith chose the name Brevimalictic chikasha for the new genus and species of mammal “in honor of the unconquerable Chickasaw people, who are known for their highly progressive, education-focused values and preservation of their Native American culture.”

 

Brevimalictis belongs to the family of mammals known as Musteliedae for badgers, wolverines and weasels. The ancient mammal discovered in the archeological dig is about the size of an existing long-tailed weasel and lived at a relatively high-elevation, in a temperate forest ecosystem in the Great Basin about 16 million years ago.

 

The jawbone replica will be on display for the public in the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur, Oklahoma.

 

 

Saint Francis Health System managing OSU Medical Center in Tulsa

 

Saint Francis Health System began managing Oklahoma State University Medical Center on October 1, 2016. The Oklahoma State University Medical Trust voted to enter into a new 10-year management contract with Saint Francis Health System to operate OSUMC in downtown Tulsa and enhance medical residency training programs with the OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine.

 

“As an organization committed to the current and future health of Oklahoma, OSU is proud to affiliate with Tulsa’s only locally owned and operated health system and the market leader in health care delivery – Saint Francis Health System,” says Dr. Kayse Shrum, president of OSU Center for Health Sciences. “Saint Francis Health System and OSUMC play an important role in providing access to health care to the medically underserved and rural areas in the region. This partnership allows both organizations to bolster their ability to meet the needs of this vulnerable population.”

 

Under the terms of the agreement, Saint Francis Health System will provide executive leadership, operational oversight and strategic direction for the hospital and its affiliated clinics and programs.

 

“This long-term management contract with Saint Francis includes capital investments to improve hospital facilities and operations, as well as medical education commitments to further enhance the longstanding relationship with the OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine and its medical residency programs in Tulsa,” says Jerry Hudson, chair of the OSU Medical Center Trust.

 

Saint Francis’ new relationship with OSUMC is not only a benefit to the employees, physicians and medical residents but also to the current and future patients who will benefit from a strengthened OSUMC.

 

"This agreement further solidifies the financial stability and future growth potential of OSU Medical Center,” OSU President Burns Hargis says. “Saint Francis brings a local partner with an outstanding record of operating superior health centers and a commitment to quality and compassionate care right to the heart of Tulsa.”

 

As the teaching hospital for the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, OSUMC plays a vital role in preparing the next generation of physicians and other medical providers who will serve Oklahoma. Through its residency programs, OSUMC trains more than 150 physicians each year. A significant number of these physicians choose to practice in rural and underserved areas throughout the region post-residency.

 

“Saint Francis Health System recognizes the critical need met by OSU medical graduates in the region and seeks to provide a sustainable infrastructure,” says Jake Henry Jr., Saint Francis Health System’s president and chief executive officer. “This is consistent with Vision 2020, our five-year strategic plan that speaks to the development of medical manpower.”

 

 

More stories like this are available for members of the OSU Alumni Association. STATE magazine is a benefit of membership in the OSU Alumni Association. To join or update your membership go to orangeconnection.org/join or call 405-744-5368.

 

 

Published by STATE Magazine Editor Elizabeth Keys, Winter 2016, Volume 12, Issue Number 2

elizabeth.keys@okstate.edu

Uploaded on December 1, 2016